Propagation of Japanese Encephalitis Virus (JEV) in VERO for Vaccine Production

Introduction:

Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) was first isolated from the brain of a fatal human case in Japan, 1934. Although symptomatic Japanese encephalitis (JE) is rare, the casefatality rate can reach as high as 30%. Of those who survive, 30-50% suffer permanent intellect, behavioural or neurological problems. With more than 3 billion people in the South-East Asia and Western Pacific regions potentially at risk of being infected by JEV, vaccination is the best prevention.

Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) was first isolated from the brain of a fatal human case in Japan, 1934. Although symptomatic Japanese encephalitis (JE) is rare, the casefatality rate can reach as high as 30%. Of those who survive, 30-50% suffer permanent intellect, behavioural or neurological problems.Development of vaccines for JE began in the 1940s with formalin-inactivated mouse brain-derived vaccines. Although effective in inducing a protective immune response, the last lot of mouse-derived vaccines was used up in May 2011 because international standards for development of JE vaccines today do not allow for this method of production anymore. With more than 3 billion people in the South-East Asia and Western Pacific regions potentially at risk of being infected by JEV, vaccination is the best prevention.

In this whitepaper, we describe the development of a JE vaccine process using a packed-bed cell culture system. We demonstrate a cost-effective bioprocessing solution and a rapid manufacturing process suitable for replacing the mouse brain-derived vaccine.

 

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